Business Maharishi in the World Today

How We Present
the News








postive
Top Stories
 
success
Top Stories
 
flops
Top Stories

Positive Trends
10 Short Summaries of Top Stories


'Forest cities': the radical plan to save China from air pollution
20 February 2017 - When Stefano Boeri imagines the future of urban China he sees green, and lots of it. Last week, the Italian architect, famed for his tree-clad Bosco Verticale (Vertical Forest) skyscraper complex in Milan, unveiled plans for a similar project in the eastern Chinese city of Nanjing. The [project] will be composed of two neighbouring towers coated with 23 species of tree and more than 2,500 cascading shrubs. 'Such a large number of plants, trees and shrubs is contributing to the cleaning of the air . . . absorbing CO2 and producing oxygen,' the architect said. The structures will reportedly house offices, a 247-room luxury hotel, a museum and even a green architecture school, and are currently under construction, set for completion next year. But Boeri now has even bolder plans for China: to create entire 'forest cities' in a country that has become synonymous with environmental degradation and smog. (more)

Enel Green Power gives renewable energy to new paediatric surgery hospital in Uganda
19 February 2017 - Enel Green Power (EGP) is participating in the project of Emergency [an NGO] and the architect Renzo Piano for the construction of a paediatric surgery hospital in Entebbe, Uganda, which is planned to be a model of paediatric excellence, environmental sustainability, and energy independence in Africa. EGP will provide 2,600 thin-film photovoltaic [solar] modules manufactured at its 3Sun factory in Catania (Italy), for a total of 289.24 kWp (kilowatt peak). The plant, which can be connected to the local medium voltage distribution grid, will give the new hospital energy autonomy and sustainability. The photovoltaic system will be installed on the roof of the hospital in such a way as to ensure its integration with the hospital's architecture, and it will also shelter the underlying structures from sunlight and rain. (more)

South Pacific islands ban western junk food and go organic
3 February 2017 - A group of south Pacific islands are banning foreign junk food imports in favour of an all-local, organic diet as a way to combat future health problems. Torba province, part of Vanuatu, aims to impose restrictions on the import of western foodstuffs and instead take advantage of its productive agricultural land and rich natural resources. Father Luc Dini, a community leader and head of the local tourism council, said a ban on foreign food imports would improve the health and wellbeing of islanders. 'At the moment we have an infiltration of junk food from overseas,' he said. '. . . . There is no need to eat imported food when we have so much local food grown organically on our islands.' Torba aims to be Vanuatu's first organic province by the year 2020. (more)

Where are the trees? New 'Green View Index' helps find answer
29 January 2017 - Where are the trees? More important, where aren't the trees? A lab at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (United States) is helping some of the world's cities answer both questions in an attempt to make them more pleasant places to live and work. In an effort to enhance the critical role trees play in urban environments -- providing cooling shade, alleviating air and noise pollution, and easing the effects of climate change -- the school's Senseable City Lab has developed an online platform that maps out the canopy in some major cities to make it easier for urban planners and ordinary citizens to see where more are needed. (more)

Why Ikea's flatpack refugee shelter won design of the year
27 January 2017 - Ikea's solar-powered Better Shelter lasts six times longer than a typical emergency tent and has already changed the lives of thousands of refugees around the world. When Hind and Saffa Hameed arrived at the Al Jamea'a refugee camp in Baghdad in 2015, having been hounded from their home in Ramadi by Islamic State militants, they had never been so glad to see an Ikea product. It was . . . an entire flat-pack refugee shelter. The Swedish furniture giant's innovation has just been crowned Beazley design of the year 2016 by London's Design Museum. (more)

Panera Bread removes artificial ingredients from U.S. menu
13 January 2017 - Bakery cafe operator Panera Bread Co said on Friday (13 January) it had removed artificial ingredients from its food menu and Panera at Home products in the United States. The company had said in August that by the year end it would remove artificial flavors and colors, preservatives and sweeteners from the food served at its 2,000 restaurants. (more)

U.S. Border Patrol recruits: wild horses, tamed by prisoners
11 January 2017 - Long before the desert sun has had a chance to heat the dusty prison yard, some 20 inmates at an Arizona state prison begin quietly tending horses. Prisoners participating in the Wild Horse Inmate Program train mustangs that will eventually be adopted by the U.S. Border Patrol, providing the agency with inexpensive but agile horses, and inmates with skills and insights they hope to one day carry with them from prison. At least 80 percent of the U.S. Border Patrol's current stable of 400 horses come from inmate training programs in Arizona, Colorado, Kansas, and Nevada. Some 55,000 mustangs roam the Western U.S., more than double the number public land can support, said Bureau of Land Management spokesman Jason Lutterman. Those that do not end up in adoption programs face an uncertain future. (more)

US: Pioneering organic chef Nora Pouillon to get lifetime award
11 January 2017 - The James Beard Foundation has named Nora Pouillon as the recipient of its Lifetime Achievement award, honoring the pioneering chef and author who has championed certified organic, environmentally conscious cuisine. Susan Ungaro, president of the foundation, said Pouillon, 'truly impacted the way people and the industry think about the food we eat.' (more)

The solar cooker that seeks its own place in the sun
5 January 2017 - Solar cookers need to be moved during the day, an inconvenience that leads to some being discarded. But what if a clever unit did its own sun tracking? Roughly 3 billion people worldwide still cook on open fires or solid fuel stoves, according to the World Health Organisation, which estimates more than 4 million people die every year because of household pollution associated with such cooking measures. To address the inconvenience of using a standard solar cooker, South African electrical engineer Wilfred Leslie Owen Fritz has spent the past year developing a version that tracks the sun's rays automatically, allowing the user to leave it in the same place. (more)

US: Cancer death rate has dropped 25 percent since 1991 peak
5 January 2017 - A steady decline over more than two decades has resulted in a 25 percent drop in the overall cancer death rate in the United States. The drop equates to 2.1 million fewer cancer deaths between 1991 and 2014. The news comes from Cancer Statistics 2017, the American Cancer Society's comprehensive annual report on cancer incidence, mortality, and survival. It is published in CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians and is accompanied by a consumer version of the publication, Cancer Facts and Figures 2017. (more)


Success of Maharishi's Programmes
10 Short Summaries of Top Stories


'Meditation and the Brain' - Dr. William Stixrud on how to tame, protect, and nurture the adolescent brain
14 February 2017 - 'Transcendental Meditation can prevent and reduce the kinds of problems that are so absurdly prevalent in young people these days,' neuropsychologist Dr William Stixrud explained at a recent David Lynch Foundation conference, at the Rubin Museum of Art in New York. With science and humour, Dr Stixrud described the adolescent brain, especially the prefrontal cortex: 'So much of the transition between being a kid and being an adult is [the] unfolding of the prefrontal cortex' - but with today's 'epic' levels of stress in young people, it may not be developing in a healthy way. Dr Stixrud cited scientific evidence that TM reduces stress and helps improve executive functions of this area of the brain. 'When you are less stressed, you can focus better, you can resist distraction better'. And with 'this increased coherence in brain function, you can organize your thinking better because your sense of priorities is better. You can integrate information better, and see with a larger perspective.' (more)

The science behind why practitioners of Transcendental Meditation are biologically younger than their age
12 February 2017 - This excerpt from the revised and expanded edition of Jack Forem's best-selling classic, Transcendental Meditation, describes the science and experience of the anti-ageing effects of TM. These effects have been 'investigated by serious scientific research, and they are real', Mr Forem writes. He cites results from three studies published in The International Journal of Neuroscience, The American Journal of Cardiology, and Journal of Personality and Social Psychology. The first study found that 'long-term TM meditators (meditating five years or longer) had biological ages an average of 12 years younger than their chronological age'. (more)

Maharishi University of Management to host international conference in April: 'Maharishi Ayur-Veda - Ayurveda and Psychology'
9 February 2017 - Maharishi University of Management (MUM) in Fairfield, Iowa, USA will be the venue for the 21st International Conference - 'Maharishi Ayur-Veda / Ayurveda and Psychology' - to be held 28-30 April. The conference is organized by Global Ayurveda Conferences and is supported by MUM, the Association of Ayurvedic Professionals of North America (AAPNA), and International University of Yoga and Ayurveda (IUYA). Plenary speakers are Robert Keith Wallace, PhD, Founding President of MUM and pioneering researcher on Transcendental Meditation; Robert Schneider, MD, Dean, Maharishi College of Perfect Health at MUM, a leading authority on science-based, mind-body and integrative medicine; and Dr Vasant Lad, founder and director of the Ayurvedic Institute in Albuquerque, New Mexico, who is respected throughout the world for his knowledge of Ayurveda. The conference is open to a wide range of participants including Ayurvedic practitioners, integrative medical doctors, psychiatrists, nurse practitioners, yoga teachers, aromatherapists, researchers, scientists, educators and the general public. (more)

India: International Maharishi AyurVeda Foundation participates in 7th World Ayurveda Congress and Arogya Expo
31 January 2017 - The International Maharishi AyurVeda Foundation (IMAVF) participated with three presentations at the 7th World Ayurveda Congress, which was held last month in Kolkata, India. Over 3,500 delegates, mainly from various Asian countries, participated in the Congress. About 150,000 visitors came to the accompanying Arogya Expo, a trade show of many companies and institutions offering products and services in the field of Ayurveda. IMAVF was also present at the Arogya Expo, at the booth of Maharishi AyurVeda Products India, with an exhibition for the next International Ayurveda Congress, to be held in London, 1-2 April 2017. (more)

A journey to brain health
30 January 2017 - Renowned author William T. Hathaway describes how his daily practice of Transcendental Meditation was 'a key component in recovering' from the effects of a brain injury suffered at birth (including the Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD) that plagued his school years) and 'helped give me access to my talent and mental abilities'. Within a few weeks after learning TM, he writes, 'my thoughts became clearer . . . . I could concentrate and I could write.' He won a scholarship to Columbia University and received the Rinehart Foundation Award for his first novel. Prof. Hathaway reviews scientific research showing increased brain wave coherence and beneficial neuroendocrine changes in the 'rejuvenating state of restful alertness' during Transcendental Meditation, noting that today his EEG 'shows normal, orderly brain waves with no sign of damage'. (more)

Danny Hitchings - Former Marine hopes to help veterans with PTSD
24 January 2017 - Danny Hitchings is a veteran of the US Marine Corps who served two tours in Iraq. Now he is president of the Maharishi University of Management student government, and his long-term goal is to teach the Transcendental Meditation technique to veterans and others suffering from post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). He says, 'TM got rid of a lot of stress in my life. It helps me maintain focus on what I am trying to do. My life is definitely better than it has ever been. I am focused on what I want in life, and I don't see any reason why I can't get there.' (more)

New study finds Transcendental Meditation reduces trauma in female prisoners
21 January 2017 - A new randomized, controlled study published in The Permanente Journal has found that the Transcendental Meditation programme significantly reduces trauma symptoms in female prison inmates. After four months of practising TM, the women inmates in the meditation group had significant reductions in total trauma symptoms, including intrusive thoughts and hyperarousal compared with controls. 'It has been difficult to find peace and happiness in such an environment (prison). . . ,' one subject said. 'Meditating twice a day has helped lessen my stress levels, allowed me to connect to and centre myself at deeper levels, and to retreat, reflect, and problem solve. . . . Meditating helps facilitate my mental clarity, while at the same time calming me. TM has not only helped me mentally, my physical health has also improved.' (more)

New women's prison study: Transcendental Meditation is 'a natural and effortless approach to reducing trauma symptoms'
19 January 2017 - Practising Transcendental Meditation for 20 minutes twice a day can significantly reduce trauma symptoms and help female prisoners find inner peace and a greater sense of inner freedom and resilience, a new study in Oregon, USA, has found. After four months of practising the meditation technique, the women inmates had significant reductions in total trauma symptoms. The study, published this week in The Permanente Journal, is being reported by science, medical, and news organizations in many countries, including Hindustan Times in India. (more)

Let your love flow - Transcendental Meditation reduces stress, improves relationships
13 January 2017 - Like many women, Janet Hoffman finds relationships a vitally important area of life. 'My heart has to flow to someone. At any given moment - a child, a sister, a parent, the family pet - someone is the object of my adoration,' writes the executive director of the Transcendental Meditation programme for women professionals in the USA. 'Nourishing someone besides myself is a joy, a fulfilment of being.' In the past she sometimes experienced that channel of expression 'just dries up', like a writer with writer's block. But after learning Transcendental Meditation she found that 'stress and fatigue just melt away. . . . my mind becomes more silent and settled, so I can listen better and appreciate others more.' (more)

African PTSD Relief reviews accomplishments of 2016
10 January 2017 - African PTSD Relief made great strides in 2016 and is poised to accomplish much more in the coming year, toward the goal of teaching Transcendental Meditation to millions of victims of trauma from at-risk communities across Africa. The Transcendental Meditation technique has been shown in peer-reviewed research studies to be a cost-effective, simple yet highly effective solution that brings significant, rapid relief from symptoms of PTSD (Post Traumatic Stress Disorder). In 2016 Transcendental Meditation teachers continued implementing initiatives of African PTSD Relief across the continent. The organization made many presentations in the US, connecting with other relief groups and agencies. Its work was featured in the news media, along with reports on the publication of related research showing significant reductions in PTSD symptoms in US prison inmates who learned Transcendental Meditation. (more)


Flops
10 Short Summaries of Top Stories


Many middle-aged workers face job problems due to physical frailty
24 January 2017 - Nearly a third of middle-aged workers suffer from some level of frailty, including fatigue, issues with walking, and other physical limitations that make them less able to hold a job, according to a UK study. Frailty is more often something considered when treating elderly patients, but middle-aged patients may face some of the same symptoms, the study team writes in the journal Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Frailty was tied to a large impact on employment. (more)

Thousands of Fukushima evacuees face hardship as subsidies to be slashed
17 January 2017 - Nearly six years after Noriko Matsumoto and her children fled Japan's Fukushima region, fearing for their health after the worst nuclear disaster since Chernobyl, they confront a new potential hardship -- the slashing of vital housing subsidies. Matsumoto is among nearly 27,000 people who left areas not designated as mandatory evacuation zones, spooked by high levels of radiation after nuclear meltdowns unleashed by a powerful earthquake and tsunami on March 11, 2011. Now, as the Fukushima local government prepares to slash unconditional housing assistance on March 31, many face the painful choice of returning to areas they still fear are unsafe, or reconciling to financial hardship . . . (more)

Gadget mountain rising in Asia threatens health, environment
15 January 2017 - The waste from discarded electronic gadgets and electrical appliances has reached severe levels in East Asia, posing a growing threat to health and the environment unless safe disposal becomes the norm. China was the biggest culprit with its electronic waste more than doubling, according to a new study by the United Nations University. But nearly every country in the region had massive increases between 2010 and 2015, including those least equipped to deal with the growing mountain of discarded smartphones, computers, TVs, air conditioners, and other goods. (more)

Ireland: Asbestos deaths set to hit record levels
5 January 2017 - Asbestos-related deaths are expected to hit a record high in the next few years as the legacy of decades of ignorance about the cancer- causing building material hits home. And safety experts have warned the danger will remain high for another 10 to 15 years, with asbestos finds rising 80 percent in recent years as the recovering economy sees an increase in building renovations and refurbishments. Ireland has no waste disposal facility for asbestos and the material must be shipped abroad, mainly to Germany. (more)

Women suffer much more work stress than men, says psychiatrist
30 December 2016 - Women suffer considerably higher levels of work-related stress, anxiety and depression than men, with workplace sexism and familial responsibilities providing additional career pressures, a leading psychiatrist has said. It comes as official figures show that women aged 25-54 are more stressed than their male colleagues, with this pressure peaking for those aged 35-44, when many women are juggling family responsibilities, such as caring for children and elderly parents. (more)

At rising rate, Nepalis working abroad go home in coffins
21 December 2016 - The number of Nepali workers going abroad more than doubled after the country began promoting foreign labor in recent years: from about 220,000 in 2008 to about 500,000 in 2015. The number of deaths among those workers has risen much faster. One out of every 2,500 workers died in 2008; last year, one out of every 500 died, according to an Associated Press analysis of data released by Nepal's Ministry of Labour and Employment. In total, over 5,000 workers from this small country have died working abroad since 2008 -- more than the number of U.S. troops killed in the Iraq War. (more)

Smog engulfs cities in northern China for fourth day
20 December 2016 - A plane carrying the chief executive of the world's biggest oil exporter was prevented from landing in the Chinese capital of Beijing on Tuesday because of thick smog blanketing large swathes of northern China. China declared a 'war on pollution' in 2014 amid concern its heavy industrial past was tarnishing its global reputation and holding back its future development. But it has struggled to reverse the damage done by decades of breakneck economic growth, much of it based on the coal-burning power sector. Despite months of efforts to hone its rapid response systems, air quality deteriorated in parts of the region on Tuesday, with the environment ministry warning that firms were flouting emergency restrictions. (more)

Air pollution in northern Chinese city surpasses WHO guideline by 100 times
19 December 2016 - Concentrations of airborne pollutants in a major northern Chinese city exceeded a World Health Organisation (WHO) guideline by 100 times on Monday as north China battled with poor air quality for the third straight day. Pollution alerts have become increasingly common in China's northern industrial heartland, especially during winter when energy demand -- much of it met by coal -- skyrockets. (more)

Is your olive oil fake?
17 December 2016 - The popularity of the Mediterranean diet has made olive oil a $16 billion-a-year industry. Unfortunately, this popularity has also led to massive fraud and corruption. Even 'extra virgin'' olive oil is often diluted with other less expensive oils, including hazelnut, soybean, corn, sunflower, palm, sesame, grape seed and/or walnut. These added oils will not be listed on the label. (more)

UK: Rough sleeping on rise in Birmingham after cuts to services for homeless
2 December 2016 - Charities, outreach workers, and the Birmingham (England) city council all view 'frightening' levels of rough sleeping as a result of local authority cuts. Birmingham city council's chief executive, Mark Rogers, acknowledges that one of the clearest consequences of the reduction in local authority budgets over the past six years is the rise in homelessness. He points to reductions in the funding of the Supporting People programme, which was designed to help people with addictions and mental health problems get into secure accommodation, as a key area of concern. 'A very simple indicator of withdrawal of grant funding is the rise in homelessness. Rough sleeping has increased considerably in the city,' he said. (more)


Global Good News reviews the impact of Maharishi's Transcendental Meditation on health

Raising health standards is a global challenge which transcends national, racial, and gender boundaries. With rising health costs threatening the economies of even the wealthiest nations, medical news repeatedly demonstrates the urgent need for a prevention-oriented approach which looks beyond specific treatments for disease to promoting good health in a holistic way.

Current health news also illustrates the inextricable relationship between individual health and the collective health of society.

Global Good News presents health news for today that looks beyond the current fragmentary and incomplete approach to health care, highlighting positive health news based on approaches that incorporate holistic knowledge of Natural Law.

Global Good News focuses on positive health news in the fields of both individual and collective health, including health news articles relating to the programmes of the Global Country of World Peace. These scientifically-validated technologies derived from the world's most ancient and complete system of natural health care, have been revived in recent decades as Maharishi's Vedic Total Knowledge Based Approach to Health. These technologies include approaches to promoting good health for the mind, body, behaviour, and environment.

Recent health news on this comprehensive system centres on its unique technologies of consciousness—Maharishi's Transcendental Meditation and Transcendental Meditation Sidhi Programme. Scientific research on these techniques comprises more than 600 studies conducted at over 250 independent universities and research institutions in 33 countries. These studies demonstrate a wide range of benefits for individual and collective health, and have appeared in many leading, peer-reviewed journals.

For example, in recent years, a multi-centre medical research team in America has attracted grants totalling over $24 million, principally from the US National Institutes of Health, for research on Transcendental Meditation and prevention of cardiovascular disease. These investigations have been published in prestigious medical journals such as American Journal of Cardiology, Archives of Internal Medicine, American Journal of Hypertension, Stroke, and Hypertension. Results show that Transcendental Meditation leads to sustained reductions in high blood pressure comparable to those commonly found with medication, but without adverse side-effects.

These and other well-controlled studies further demonstrate that Transcendental Meditation reduces atherosclerosis ('hardening of the arteries'), improves cardiac functioning and well-being in people with heart disease, reduces mortality from cardiovascular disease and all causes, decreases hospital admissions and health care costs, reduces smoking and alcohol consumption, and improves psychological health and well-being in both children and adults, including elderly people.

A growing number of physicians worldwide recommend Transcendental Meditation to their patients. The website: www.doctorsontm.org sponsored by The American Association of Physicians Practicing the Transcendental Meditation Program', provides an opportunity to ask questions of leading doctors who utilize Transcendental Meditation in their clinical practice.

In offering these Vedic technologies to the world, Maharishi Mahesh Yogi, Founder of the Global Country of World Peace, has revolutionized our understanding of health and established development of higher states of consciousness as fundamental to the creation of perfect health.

In reporting on health news, Global Good News is pleased to note indications of growing interest in the applications of TM and the TM-Sidhi Programme among major health-care providers and policy makers.

© Copyright 2017 Global Good News®
health news more

Good News | Organic | David Lynch
Business Financial News | Medical News / Health News


World News | Genetic Engineering | Education | Business | Health News

Search | Global News | Agriculture and Environmental News | Business News
Culture News | Education News | Government News | Health News
Science and Technology News | World Peace | Maharishi Programmes
Press Conferences | Transcendental Meditation Celebration Calendars | Gifts
News by Country | News in Pictures | What's New | Modem/High Speed | RSS/XML