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Mongolian dog tradition revived to protect sheep, leopards
20 December 2015 - Five months ago, sheep herders Chulunjav Bayarsaikhan and Tumurbaatar Davaasuren were joined by a new partner, a shaggy, 11-month-old bankhar dog that a hundred years ago would have been a far more common sight outside the country's tent homes known as gers. A group of researchers and herders are trying to reinstate the bankhar to its historic place beside their masters. The dog is native to Mongolia but nearly disappeared over the course of mass urbanization drives during the Soviet era. Using dogs to protect herds also can help protect snow leopards as their population falls below 1,000, mostly in the western Altai mountain range and in the south, near the Gobi Desert, according to WWF Mongolia director Batbold Dorjgurkhem. (more)

Mongolia, between big neighbours, seeks permanent neutrality
2 November 2015 - Sandwiched between China and Russia, landlocked Mongolia has long tread a middle path, maintaining a balance between Moscow and Beijing while referring to the U.S. and other remote allies as 'third neighbours'. Now, with a wealth of mineral resources set to transform its largely agrarian economy, Mongolia is moving to cement that even-handed status by adopting permanent neutrality as a safeguard against outside dominance. (more)

Lotus on Mongolian state emblem delights Indian Prime Minister Modi
18 May 2015 - Prime Minister Narendra Modi discovered a 'special connection' with Mongolia when he entered the country's Parliament to deliver a speech, the first foreign leader to do so on Sunday. At the end of his address to lawmakers at the State Great Hural, the Parliament, Mr Modi turned around and pointed to state emblem, which had a lotus among other symbols. (more)

Mongolia's nomads modernize traditional tent homes with solar panels
13 April 2014 - With 250 days of sunshine a year, Mongolia's potential for solar energy is vast but mostly underutilized. That's beginning to change though -- a new government sponsored initiative aims to equip traditional dome-like homes called gers (tents made of felt and yak's wool) with portable solar home systems (SHS) to make life a little easier in the northern highlands. So far, almost 70 per cent of nomadic people now have access to electricity thanks to newly installed solar panels. (more)

Mongolia's Nomads modernize traditional tent homes with solar panels
17 December 2013 - With 250 days of sunshine a year, Mongolia's potential for solar energy is vast but mostly underutilized. That's beginning to change though -- a new government sponsored initiative aims to equip traditional dome-like homes called gers (tents made of felt and yak's wool) with portable solar home systems (SHS) to make life a little easier in the northern highlands. So far, almost 70 per cent of nomadic people now have access to electricity thanks to newly installed solar panels. (more)

Mongolia to be energy self-sufficient by 2014, says minister
29 April 2013 - Minister of Energy M. Sonompil said last week that the ministry is aiming to make Mongolia energy self sufficient by next year and plans to expand energy production further to eventually become an energy exporter. The minister's comments came during a regular update on the ministry's current projects and plans. The updates are part of the government's actions to increase transparency. (more)

UNESCO supports community media friendly legislative reform in Mongolia
20 December 2012 - 'Community media is a new concept in Mongolia, but I believe it is the time to understand it,' said Ms Batchimag, Mongolian MP and Chairperson of the Parliament's working group on media law reform, last week in her opening remarks at a seminar on 'Community Radio for Community Development.' The seminar was organized in Ulaanbaatar by the recently-established Community Radio Association of Mongolia and by Globe International, with the support of the UNESCO Beijing Office. (more)

Filipino invention to help Mongolians breathe free
11 November 2012 - Mongolia is adopting Filipino technology to help improve the health of people in its urban centres. Eco-G NanoTechnology (Philippines) and Erdene and Gochioco LLC Company (Mongolia) signed a memorandum of agreement to avert the life-threatening conditions due to fuel emissions. 'Test results from Land Transportation Office-accredited testing centres have shown that Eco-G3000 can reduce toxic emissions up to 80 per cent,' said Eco-G president Alexander Cayaba. The system has been installed in tricycles, motorcycles, cars, trucks, and buses in Metro Manila. (more)

Mongolian nomadic herders get electricity from off-grid solar
18 October 2012 - Life has changed somewhat dramatically for approximately 100,000 herder families across Mongolia after a new effort led by the Mongolian government helped supply portable off-grid solar home systems which are now generating electricity for lights, televisions, radios, mobile phone charging, and small appliances. Over half a million men, women, and children now have access to electricity wherever they travel as they follow their herds of yak, cattle, sheep, goats, and camels around the 1.5 million square kilometres they call home. (more)

Mongolia: We want to be Chile
28 September 2012 - What do you do if you're a small country, rich in minerals that went from boom to bust when the bottom fell out of the commodities market? Copy Chile, is the answer. Chile's experience as a small, copper-dependent economy that prudently stashed cash during the boom years, allowing it to ride out the 2008-09 world economic crash and uncork anti-cyclical spending, was the perfect case study for Mongolia. The central Asian country is poised for a eye-popping boom: its economy is expected to treble in size in the coming years as giant projects come onstream, among them Oyu Tolgoi, which is due to start up next year and to become one of the world's five biggest copper-gold mines. Non-mining investment is also growing fast. (more)


Success of Maharishi's Programmes
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First president of democratic Mongolia invites collaboration with MUM Sustainable Living faculty
11 October 2012 - The first president of democratic Mongolia, Dr Professor Ochirbat, is interested in expanding the Center for Ecology and Sustainable Development at Mongolian University of Science and Technology (MUST), of which he is currently director. Professor Ochirbat invited Lonnie Gamble, founding faculty and curriculum director of the Sustainable Living department at Maharishi University of Management, 'to document Mongolia's progress in implementing sustainable technologies, and in other preservation projects around Mongolia', said Dr Tom Stanley, vice-chair of the MUM Board of Trustees. The former president also invited Professor Gamble to help develop a UN World Heritage site in the Gobi Desert. (more)

In Mongolia, conference stirs Consciousness-Based Education interest
11 October 2012 - A delegation of Maharishi University of Management (MUM) professors was invited to Mongolia to address a conference about Consciousness-Based Education. The group, which included top professors from several academic departments, initially led a conference organized by faculty at the country's largest university, Mongolian University of Science and Technology (MUST). After the conference, many of the MUM professors travelled to other universities and schools to lecture on Consciousness-Based Education, an integral aspect of the MUM curriculum, and what makes it a unique and highly effective approach. (more)

Maharishi University of Management professors central to conference at Mongolia's largest university
11 October 2012 - A group of faculty from Maharishi University of Management (MUM) were invited to the largest university in Mongolia to participate in and lead a three-day seminar. The MUM professors were central to the seminar, which looked at human development, sustainability, and the possibility of conducting management research on Transcendental Meditation. (more)

Mongolia welcomes visiting Transcendental Meditation experts
11 October 2012 - A delegation from Maharishi University of Management (MUM) in the United States visited Mongolia for about a week to talk to schools and universities about Consciousness-Based Education. While there, they also gave a presentation about Transcendental Meditation for the general public, and met with local people who had already learned the technique. Everyone, including the public, was keenly interested to hear about the full development of human consciousness and the full vision of possibilities offered by the Transcendental Meditation programme. (more)

Mongolia: Live EEG demonstration shows measurable effects of Transcendental Meditation
11 October 2012 - One of the presentations at a conference on Innovative Approaches to Human Development, Leadership Training, and Research at the largest university in Mongolia was given by Dr Fred Travis, Director of the Center for Brain, Consciousness, and Cognition at Maharishi University of Management. Dr Travis discussed brain functioning, EEG (electroencephalography) research, and brain potential. He also gave a live EEG demonstration. A practitioner of Transcendental Meditation was hooked up to EEG electrodes and had her brain waves monitored during normal activity and then during meditation. Several other MUM faculty also presented at the conference. (more)

Mongolia: MUM faculty invited to conference on Consciousness-Based Education, sustainability
11 October 2012 - A delegation from Maharishi University of Management (MUM) traveled to Mongolia for a three-day seminar and workshop, invited by the largest university in Mongolia, Mongolian University of Science and Technology (MUST). The seminar and workshop were both inspired by a visit MUST faculty made to Maharishi University of Management last spring, and the workshop was designed for presentations by the MUM professors. (more)

Mongolia: Rising interest in benefits of Transcendental Meditation in education
11 October 2012 - A visit to Mongolia quickly turned into a speaking tour for a group of professors from Maharishi University of Management, USA. In addition to helping conduct a conference at the largest university in Mongolia, Mongolian University of Science and Technology, members of the MUM delegation, including President Dr Bevan Morris, gave well-received presentations about Transcendental Meditation and Consciousness-Based Education to students and faculty at several other schools, colleges, and universities in the country. (more)

Mongolian universities inspired by MUM's sustainable programmes, technologies
11 October 2012 - One purpose of the visit to Mongolia by a delegation invited from Maharishi University of Management (MUM) in the USA, was to help Mongolian universities implement sustainable practices and technologies. To this end, Professor Lonnie Gamble, founding faculty and curriculum director for the MUM Sustainable Living department, addressed a conference at the country's largest university on the issue of how Mongolia can rapidly develop economically in a way that protects the country's immense natural beauty and integrity. (more)

President of Maharishi University of Management presents Consciousness-Based Education at largest university in Mongolia
11 October 2012 - The President of Maharishi University of Management, Dr Bevan Morris, recently spoke at a conference at the largest university in Mongolia. The principal theme of the conference was innovative approaches to human development, leadership training, and research. At the three-day seminar Dr Morris gave the keynote address on the success of Consciousness-Based Education around the world and how to utilize Consciousness-Based Education to unfold the inner genius of every student. (more)

Spirituality a central element of life in Mongolia
11 October 2012 - Who are the people practising Transcendental Meditation in Mongolia? Mainly professional people: doctors, attorneys, accountants, engineers, geologists, educators, and government officials, said Dr Tom Stanley, vice-chair of the Board of Trustees at Maharishi University of Management, in Mongolia recently with several MUM professors to speak at a conference on Consciousness-Based Education. 'They are looking for the light of life, they are looking for spiritual development . . . something that has substance.' (more)


Flops
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Massive Mongolian mine endangers nomads' water, way of life
30 September 2014 - Mongolia -- the land of nomads -- boasts one of the world's fastest-growing economies, thanks in part to that massive Oyu Tolgoi mine. It alone is expected to account for up to one-third of the country's gross domestic product and deliver much-needed infrastructure and good jobs. But as the mine scales up, the operation that's now led by mining giant Rio Tinto has struggled to live up to its promises of world-class environmental standards. The mine pledged, for example, to leave herders' scarce water sources untouched. While company officials say the problems haven't had a major impact on locals' water, herders say that since the company built the wells, the land and their own wells have gotten drier. The mine has put itself directly at odds with a traditional way of life that's already facing the strains of drought and climate change. Mongolia has warmed more than any other country in the last century, nearly 4 degrees Fahrenheit in 70 years. Grazing land is disappearing. Wells are drying up. Plants that survived years of drought now are withering. Herds of camels are dying. The changes have altered basic life here, sparking an exodus of traditional herders from the dry, dusty plains to the shantytowns of the capital city, Ulan Bator. 'I would say this is the beginning of a disaster,' said Ravdaudorj Khayandorj, a south Gobi herder near the mine. 'Not many people are left. They're all fleeing to the north.' (more)

Mongolia: Maternal nurses say congenital defects on the rise due to air pollution
20 January 2014 - Nurses at Ulaanbaatar's leading maternity hospital hold air pollution responsible for a dramatic rise in the number of pregnant women giving birth to babies with brain damage and significant birth defects. Speaking with the UB Post on the condition of anonymity, a senior neonatal nurse with over thirty years experience at Ulaanbaatar's First Maternity Hospital explained that since 2000, she and her colleagues have seen a notable rise in congenital and birth defects as air pollution has worsened. Babies born with intracranial pressure, cleft palates, cleft lips and other birth defects were rare in the post-Soviet period, while birth defects -- especially preterm births -- have become increasingly common. Research suggests that a leading factor in the growing number of preterm births could be related to high levels of exposure to carbon monoxide produced by coal burning. 'A survey conducted by the Health Ministry, with the support of WHO (World Health Organization) on air pollution's effect on human health, shows that air pollution can significantly affect the health development of infants. In recent years, the birth defect development rate of newborns has been on the rise. It is not only cleft lip and palates or defective organ development, the development of defects covers many organ systems, leading to an increase of defective embryos, which are not viable,' said Health Minister N. Udval. (more)

China police seal off restive Inner Mongolia towns
28 May 2011 - Police sealed off parts of two county seats in China's Inner Mongolia for a second day Saturday in what residents described as a kind of martial law after protests triggered by the death of a Mongolian herder run over by a Chinese truck driver. The protests are believed to be the region's largest in 20 years. Behind the protests is a sense that Mongolian identity is under threat. Their traditional way of life -- herding sheep and cattle -- has almost disappeared as the grasslands give out to mining, farming, and urban sprawl. A coal mining boom is accelerating the degradation, and a standoff between herders and coal truckers precipitated the recent protests. Unlike Tibetans in Tibet and Uighurs in Xinjiang, ethnic Mongolians are a small minority. Many speak little or no Mongolian, having been educated in Chinese school systems. (more)

Mongolia declares state of emergency following election unrest
2 July 2008 - A four-day state of emergency was declared in Mongolia late on Tuesday, after a riot in the capital Ulan Bator over alleged election fraud killed five people. About 700 protesters were detained in the unrest that followed a general election. Following is a short chronology of Mongolian elections and frequent leadership changes since the country emerged from decades of Soviet influence in 1990. (more)

Mongolians protest over foreign-owned mine
12 April 2006 - There were demonstrations Tuesday in Mongolia's capital over the government's handling of a major foreign mining contract. Those opposed want the national minerals law changed to give the government a large share in any foreign-owned mine. Mining is a major part of the economy of the impoverished country. (more)

Protesters storm Mongolian party building
12 January 2006 - Over a thousand protesters stormed the headquarters of Mongolia's largest political party today after it pulled out of the country's 15-month-old ruling coalition. The party accused the current leadership of failing to fight corruption and worsening poverty in the formerly communist country. (more)

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